In Iraqi Kurdistan, the receding waters of the Tigris River unveiled the remains of an ancient palace in the fall of 2018.

In Iraqi Kurdistan, the receding waters of the Tigris River unveiled the remains of an ancient palace in the fall of 2018. The Bronze Age palace, part of the city of Kemune, emerged on the eastern bank of the Tigris in Duhok province.
A joint effort involving German and Kurdish archaeologists from the University of Tübingen, Kurdistan Archaeology Organization, and Duhok Directorate of Antiquities led to the discovery. Thick mud brick walls, some over 6 feet high, and rooms with plastered walls were identified.
Dr. Ivana Puljiz noted the presence of vividly colored wall paintings in the palace. Situated on a terrace overlooking the Tigris Valley, the ruins stand at a height of about 23 feet. The site once belonged to the ancient Mittani empire, covering parts of modern Iraq and Syria from the 15th to 14th centuries BC.

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